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news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
a century after one of the defining civil rights era, a ban from little rock writes a new chapter in the history books. >>> there is news tonight of yet another multiple shooting. police have charged a 15-year-old boy with multiple counts of murder after discovering the bodies of five people, including three children, in a home in albuquerque, new mexico. the victims were shot with what is believed to be an ar-15 rifle. >>> moving overseas, there's more tonight on that hostage situation in algeria. after yesterday's final assault by algerian forces, another 25 bodies were found today by a bomb squad, clearing the gas plant of explosives. that raised the death toll to at least 81, including one american. algerian officials said it was unclear whether the additional bodies were those of hostages or militants who took over the plant. >>> rare snow and ice brought parts of britain to a standstill this weekend, shutting down travel and stranding hundreds of passengers at london's heathrow airport. at least 20% of flights in and out of europe's busiest airport were canceled today, with
conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could think of no better way to celebrate than by paying a visit to coretta scott king at atlanta's iconic e
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere
conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of pr
that brought them closer to the action than ever. >>> honoring the civil rights leader by hopping on a train, more on that, where that train is going and how you can ride. [ telephone rings ] good evening this is flo. [laughs] yes, i'm that flo. aren't you sweet! licensed phone-ups available 24/7. call 1-800-progressive. >>> good morning, b.a.r.t. is back on time. it was a quick turn around. we could gotten word that may they be experiencing major b.a.r.t. delays. they were dealing with a slight computer problems problem. we just -- problem. they were able to resolve the computer problems quickly. they are on a saturday schedule. it is the martin luther king holiday and a lot of mass transiting including muni, golden gate ferries and ac transit on the east bay, on a typical saturday or sunday schedule. we're still watching this traffic alert. one lane is still blocked northbound 880 approaching washington street. we are really not seeing much of a delay. it's because there's just not as much traffic on the roads. a lot of schools are out. no post
you very much. >> thank you. >> now the daughter of civil rights leaders martin luther king jr. and st. john's scott king desert rose in the life and legacy of coretta space king. she talks with books of america the publishers' trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice, who was scott bagley? >> well the sister of coretta scott king. >> and your mother. >> yes, my mother, so my aunt. he and my mother grew up in alabama together obviously and she later became a john notte professor. she founded the university in pennsylvania. so, a very lively woman. and unfortunately passed last year in june after completing the book. >> so this book is desert rose, the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt. when did she write this book? >> welcome it was a journey that began with my mother's request to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threatened she was confirmed she wouldn't be lost and wanted people to know she wasn't just the life of martin luther king jr. and mother of children but the role in the movement and very much an a
. >> it is a way to educate the young about the past civil rights strag rights -- struggles. and elissa harrington is there with more about how they can learn to ride the ride. >> reporter: this freedom train is to honor the birthday of martin luther king and leaves the station at 9:30. this is the 27th year that the mlk association of santa clara valley has organized this ride from san jose to san francisco. it commemorates his march from selma alabama to the dap toll of montgomery in 1965 and covers 54 miles. this is the longest running freedom train in the united states and the rides were brought about my king's wife. the freedom train today has four stops. again, it will leave san jose at 9:30 and will stop three times along the peninsula in sunnyvale, palo alto and san mateo. round trip tickets are $10 you are advised to come early because lines can get long. live in san jose, elissa harrington. cbs 5. >>> a march and parade will proceed from the caltrains depot. that will be followed by an interface commemoration ceremony. and also in san fran
very much. >> now bernice king the daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king jr. and coretta scott king discusses the recently published biography of her mother. desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king. she talked with booktv at bookexpo america publishing's annual trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice king who is edith scott dagley? >> guest: at edith scott bickley -- coretta scott king was the wife of martin luther king jr. -- cohost land your mother. >> guest: yes my mother so she was my aunt. she and my mother grew up in alabama together and she later became a drama professor. in fact she founded the drama department at the state university. she was a very lively woman and unfortunately passed last year in june. after completing this book. >> this book is desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt eva scott dagley? when did she write this book lacks. >> guest: well it was a journey that began with my mother's requested 1966 to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threaten
and vice president paid tribute to dr. king a second time, pausing at a bust of the slain civil rights leader in the rotunda. during the procession down pennsylvania avenue, the president and first lady walked part of the way and later took their place in the reviewing stand as the inaugural parade began. ♪ >> reporter: and the party continued into the night. ♪ he's president and he's on fire ♪ >> reporter: michelle obama wowed the audiences at two inaugural balls in a ruby chiffon and velvet gown by jason wu. but the celebration was not as grand as 2009 which saw the president and first lady attend ten balls. >> now that the parties are over the work on president obama's second term begins. susan mcginnis with more on that. good morning. >> reporter: anne-marie, good morning. yes, item number one is the debt limit. we learned on monday that the house will vote tomorrow on raising the debt ceiling for a period of three months, and the republicans have made a big concession. they had their dance and took a moment to savor the scene. now it's time to get ba
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
to get underway at the nation's capitol. they will honor civil rights leader martin luther king, the same day they celebrate the inauguration of the first african-american president to his second term and we will take a live look at the crowds gathering, about 900,000 people are expected to witness president obama recite the oath of office and here is the live look. there are a lot of people crowded there. susan mcginnis joins us live from washington. >> reporter: this is one of the biggest days for washington dc when it comes to pomp
as the city gears up for inauguration day. >>> remembering a civil right's leader. how the bay area and the nation are honoring martin luther king jr. >>> tonight planners in washington, d.c. are putting the finishing touches on the big inauguration ceremonies. president obama will be sworn in publicly outside the capital tomorrow. ktvu's ken pritchett live now in the nation's capital and he tells us this inauguration will be very different from president obama's first inauguration. >> reporter: tomorrow morning hundreds of thousands of people will stand in line for hours in the cold so they can take in history as president obama takes a ceremonial oath of office here at the capital. obviously it is a huge event. but it is not as huge as what we saw four years ago. as the finishing touches are put in place the stage and thousands of chairs set for president obama's second in inaugural. there are people like gail olaney with memories still fresh from last time. >> if there were so many people it was awesome. it was surreal. it really was. >> reporter: the inaugural drew 1.8 million p
and remembering martin luther king junior. the ceremonies today.. to honor the civil rights icon. join us for cbs 5 eyewitness news this morning... beginning >>> here's a look at today's forecast in some cities around the country. washington, big day there, we're looking at 42, possibility of rain or snow in the afternoon. atlanta, st. louis, and denver, lots of sunshine there. seattle, cloudy, though, with a high of 38. >>> there are new signs the housing market is rebounding. the commerce department reported last week that construction was up more than 12% last month. as carter evans reports, california is leading the boom. >> it's really pretty. >> yeah it's looking very good. >> reporter: erin and dino just bought their dream home. >> it felt like the economy was starting to turn and at the same time the interest rates were getting lower and lower. that created a sense urgency. >> reporter: they are hardly alone. here in east los angeles sales have tripped over the year. they're now selling homes faster than they can build them. >> this community is hopping. there's
in publicly on a bible once used by the civil rights leader. he'll also use a bible that was once used by abraham lincoln. 800,000 people are expected in the national mall. >> what we're doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation we call home. >> reporter: the president and vice president, along with their famili families, will start by attending st. john's. the swearing-in is followed by a parade and the glitzy inaugural balls. the security is extremely tight. 15,000 military and law enforcement personnel will watch over the proceedings. >> watching an event this large, with this number of people coming, takes a lot of corporate nation. >> reporter: the president and first lady showed off their love. the president weighing in on his wife's new hair-do. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. >> let me tell you, it has just been a true thrill to watch this handsome, charming individual grow into the man and the president that he is. >> reporter: in a speech, president obama will reach out to some of those people who voted against him opinion and he'll call on w
luther king, junior. hundreds celebrated the civil rights leader legacy. he lead the congregation and he says dr. king focused on people in need. >> he was concerned about and trying to make sure that he really touched the real people, those who had greatest need. and of course there were those who were in poverty and those who were poor and those who had no jobs. >> he has taken dr. king's message to heart. it provides more than one million free meals a year along with affordable housing and health care. >> tomorrow is a holiday so a lot of people will be off and wondering what the weather will be like. >> exactly. leigh glaser will be back. >> it will be terrific. if you look back east at the inauguration festivities. washington, d.c., the expected temperature is 42 degrees. a 30% chance of a few snow showers. it looks high and dry and 52 for dallas and phoenix 75. if you are traveling airbeds -- around the state it will be a mild to almost warm day statewide. southern california is getting up into the 80s. my map is going to come up here in a second. 80 degrees for los angeles. san di
, junior. hundreds celebrated the civil rights leader legacy. he lead the congregation and he says dr. king focused on people in need. >> he was concerned about and trying to make sure that he really touched the real people, those who had greatest need. and of course there were those who were in poverty and those who were poor and those who had no jobs. >> he has taken dr. king's message to heart. it provides more than one million free meals a year along with affordable housing and health care. >> tomorrow is a holiday so a lot of people will be off and wondering what the weather will be like. >> exactly. leigh glaser will be back. >> it will be terrific. if you look back east at the inauguration festivities. washington, d.c., the expected temperature is 42 degrees. a 30% chance of a few snow showers. it looks high and dry and 52 for dallas and phoenix 75. if you are traveling airbeds -- around the state it will be a mild to almost warm day statewide. southern california is getting up into the 80s. my map is going to come up here in a second. 80 degrees for los angeles. san diego warming to
renovations. >> civil rights activists including the reverend jesse jackson participated in a wreath laying ceremony over the weekend at the memorial dedicated to dr. martin luther king, jr. he would have turned 84 last week. today is the national holiday in king's memory. when president obama takes his public oath of office in a few hours, he will use a bible that belonged to king. and in case you're wondering what's closed today. federal and state courts are closed. as are city and county offices. banks and post offices are closed. there is no mail delivery today. as for public transit.bart and muni are operating on a saturday schedule there is weekend service for golden gate transit ferries and a-c transit buses. however, samtrans and caltrain are operating on regular weekday schedule. and in san francisco.parking meters are enforced. >> the dream catcher-the dream lighter-787, still wondering of the fire that could have caused from a battery. they could still be problems with wiring or other internal electrical components. and alsoa commuter plane skids off the runway at newark liberty
, they remember the fight and struggle led by martin luther king and other people during the civil rights era to break through america's history of racism, of segregation, of people being marginalized. king lead to a lot of what we know now as historic legislation, the civil rights act, the voting rights act, the fair housing act. so there is a legacy that king left the benefit it and created the conditions under which president obama could even be elected to you do not have the voting rights act, you do not have black elected officials did you do not have the black vote -- a voting turnout that ultimately becomes critical in the 1990's, 2000, and of course in 2008, even in 2012. there is a long legacy. president obama himself acknowledges that he stands on those shoulders. not just the shoulders of former presidents that he talks about, but also the civil rights leaders. so it is significant that this is being held on martin luther king's holiday. and, of course, he is the president that is there when the martin luther king memorial actually comes about and is put up here in washington, d.c.
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
of illinois, that will have a whole bunch of american flags on it, not to mention the civil rights float that's going to be here, the mlk float, a lot of people just very excited. we are pleased, very happy, relieved that it was not like four years ago where it was freezing cold, but still a lot of folks who are coming in. they're bundled up. they're ready to go. soledad? >> suzanne, it's very interesting. i remember four years ago when i was sitting next to david gergen, presidential adviser, and when the motorcade was going down the parade route, and then it stopped, and president obama and the first lady got out of their car. he was really stressed by that. he was almost, i think it's fair to say, in a panic. he was so nervous because, of course, he was just worried. worried about the security, worried about the nation's first black president who had been sworn in, and i remember that moment when they finally got back in the car, he breathed a sigh of relief, kind of slumped in his chair, and said, oh, i'm so glad that moment is over. for secret service, i would imagine too, the same feeli
, the humiliation that i went through. it was -- it was the toughest four years i've ever had. and when civil rights took action, i -- oh, my gosh. tears of joy. i know that people after me can now participate in high school sports without going through the battle that i had to. >> tatiana, i think some people watching they don't understand how the government could sort of inject sbooits a school and say you must allow disabled athletes to compete equally with able-bodied athletes because athleticism is different. we have paralympics and olympics, special olympics and olympics, but what exactly can be done to change some of the nature of athletics in schools so that there isn't this complete segregation? >> well, you know, when i went into high school, it's about opportunity and it's about being involved with your peers. and it's really about educating that. whether you have a disability or not, everyone should be involved. and i think it's great that, you know, it's being taken into action into schools. you know, this opens up huge doors, you know. like people going to college right after high scho
in the civil rights movement has died. vern nonnathaniel dobson. in the early 1960's, reverend dobson committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in the faith community for four decades. we got a chance to speak to 96-year-old anne miller who worked with reverend dobson to start the maryland food bank. we asked her what she remembers about him. >> he did something. he didn't just wring his hands and say, it's terrible. he knew something could be done about it, and he did it. >> mayor stephanie rawlings-blake said we must give thanks to reverend dobson for his honesty and perseverance in the face of racism and cruelty. another released a statement saying i am proud to call him friend and his death is a loss for anyone who cares about equal for all. >> and gun rights supporters are finding ways to demonstrate their passions over the gun control issue. more from washington. >> thousands of demonstrators joined a quiet march through the streets of washington to send a message to washington about gun violence. among those in attendance, about 100 parents from newtown,
jean quan said that threatens work in loss angeles has been advocating for civil rights groups and local committees. >> the manhunt for the suspects involved in a shooting of an undercover officer in oakland is over. police have in custody five men are believed to have gained ties. >> the shooting happened monday night between seminary in harmon ave. police say, the officer was working as part of a new violence reduction crying team and was alone when he was confronted and shot by several suspects. >> the officer is now at home recovering from his injuries. >> sexual assault allegations against 49ers star wide receiver michael crabtree do not appear to be holding up under investigation. >> investigators say there were looking into a complaint that crabtree had assaulted a woman at a hotel party after the 49ers defeated the green bay packers in a playoff game earlier this month. >> however, witnesses tell investigators that crabtree did not assault anyone and police have not found any physical evidence of the attack. >> crabtree has been denied any wrongdoing and has been cooper
to introduce civil rights leader merle evers who committed her life to all americans. mrs. evers will lead us i invocation. . >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january the 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders. the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces, blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spir yit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, woman kind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may inherit dignitiy and inalienable rights of everyone, man, boy, and girl be honored. may all of your people, especially the least the these flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors wh
footsie games. you can't have it both ways. >> what is the right thing? >> you have to come up with a settlement. colorado law won't tell a catholic institution you can't settle. what they can't do is to hide under the cloak of civil law, and say i'm sorry, we're still pro life, but you know what? you're not really a person when you are a fetus, because we're just hiding under colorado civil law. if that's the case, then they made a mockery of catholic teaching and they should be stripped of their catholicism. >> you look at hospitals, it kind of contradicts that. when you look at the law, when it's contraception, that's one thing. but this is the law, and so i find this one a conundrum. >> the catholic church is always fighting laws. we're fighting against governor cuomo who wants to bring in nonphysicians to treat women who want abortions. the catholic church takes its dictates from natural law. as far as i'm concerned, it's not as difficult as some people may want to make it out to be not a whole lot of wiggle room if you are truly catholic. >> a catholic hospital has been s
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)